Featured Image for Erik Erikson's Stages of Psychosocial Development

Erik Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development

Erikson was a stage theorist who took Freud’s controversial theory of psychosexual development and modified it as a psychosocial theory, as he rejected the central importance of the sexual drive in favour of the progressive emergence of identity. Like Freud and many others, Erik Erikson maintained that personality develops in a predetermined order, and builds upon each previous stage. This is called the epigenetic principle.

Featured Image for Jerome Bruner's Theory of Sociocultural Development - Collage Artwork made by Mathieu Bouriel

Jerome Bruner’s Theory of Sociocultural Development

The American psychologist Jerome S. Bruner, strongly influenced by the work of Russian psychologist Lev Vygostky, further developed and applied his ideas in the field of education. Bruner declared that Vygotsky has convinced him about the impossibility of understanding the concept of human development in any other way than as a process of assistance, of collaboration between child and adult, where the adult is taking up the role of a sociocultural mediator. Due to its distinct features, we consider the theory to be a sociocultural constructivist one.

Featured Image for The Social Genetic Model of Cognitive Development - Abstract Artwork depicting two individuals communicating

Cognitive Development: The Social Genetic Model

During the 1970′, at Geneva, a new perspective on cognitive development has begun to emerge. The self-defined school of socio-genetical psychology advanced theories that represented a challenge addressed to the spirit of genetical epistemology.

Willem Doise, Gabriel Mugny and Jean Claude Deschamp, to name but a few of the representatives, declare that social interactions constitute the privileged setting which gives birth to the intellectual acquisitions of the child. There is a direct cause and effect link between social interaction and individual cognitive development.

Featured Image for Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Abraham Maslow’s Hierachy of Needs

Abraham H. Maslow felt as though conditioning theories did not adequately capture the complexity of human behavior. In a 1943 paper called A Theory of Human Motivation, Maslow presented the idea that human actions are directed toward goal attainment. Any given behavior could satisfy several functions at the same time; for instance, going to a bar could satisfy one’s needs for self-esteem and for social interaction. His theory later became known as the human hierarchy of needs.

Featured Image for Albert Bandura's Concept of Self-efficacy - Monochrome Collage Artwork depicting a woman with high self-efficacy

Albert Bandura’s Concept of Self-efficacy

Albert Bandura’s concept of Self-efficacy, or confidence as it is commonly known, is one of the most enabling psychology models to have been adopted into positive psychology.

Self-efficacy is an individual’s optimistic belief in their innate ability, competence or chances of succesfully accomplishing a task and producing a favorable outcome.

Featured Image for Lev Vygotsky's Theory of Social Development - Collage Artwork depicting a duplicated girl's face

Lev Vygotsky’s Theory of Social Development

The work of Lev Vygotsky (1934) has become the foundation of much research and theory in cognitive development over the past several decades, particularly of what has become known as Social Development Theory.

Vygotsky’s theories stress the fundamental role of social interaction in the development of cognition (Vygotsky, 1978), as he believed strongly that community plays a central role in the process of “making meaning.”

Featured Image for Attribution Theory and Motivation - Artwork depicting a group of people with flowers instead of heads

Attribution Theory and Motivation

Attribution enables the individual to explain his own behaviours and those of others, to interpret what is happening around him and to search for plausible causes that determine an event or action. Attribution Theory must explain the occurrence of certain cognitions using inference, thus reaching a conclusion on the basis of evidence and reasoning, using behaviour as a starting point.

Fritz Heider (buy his books from Amazon) stated that attribution theory concerns the process by which an individual interprets events “as being cause by particular parts of the relatively stable environment”.

Featured Image for Impostor Syndrome: Understand and overcome it - Collage Image depicting a woman visually fragmented

Impostor Syndrome: Understand and Overcome it

Impostor Syndrome (also known as impostorism, fraud syndrome or the impostor experience) is a pervasive feeling of insecurity, self-doubt, or fraudulence despite often overwhelming evidence to the contrary. It usually strikes intelligent and successful individuals and it often comes to surface after an especially notable accomplishment – be it an admission to a prestigious university, winning an award, earning a promotion or obtaining public acclaim.

Featured Image for Rolland Viau's Theory of Motivation - Collage Artwork depicting the head of a man wearing eyeglasses

Rolland Viau’s Theory of Motivation

Inspired by the sociocognitive approaches to learning, Rolland Viau  proposes an innovative motivation model in the context of acquiring information and completing goals.

Although the model has been initially designed for the learning student, its structures can be just as easily and successfully applied to any situation where an individual is faced with a challenge and a need to be completing a goal.

Freedom – a Haiku

Infinite inside
A greater, sunny freedom
an Intelligence

Connect on Social Media

KEEP EVOLVING

© 2019 Envision your Evolution | All rights reserved​ | As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

Scroll to Top