Analytical Psychology

Journey to the Deep Unconscious

Analytical psychology is a form of psychotherapy and depth analysis that was pioneered by the famous Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gustav Jung. This unique approach is marked by its focus on the symbolic and spiritual experiences that influence human life. Analytical psychology is built on Jung’s groundbreaking theory of archetypes and the collective unconscious, a deep psychic space that is shared by all of humanity. Since its inception, analytical psychology has continued to evolve through ongoing research and incorporation of findings from other related disciplines and schools of thought.

As a result, it is a constantly expanding and evolving field that offers a great deal of promise for therapeutic innovation and in-depth inquiry into the human psyche.

If you’re interested in delving deeper into this fascinating area of study, we highly recommend that you peruse our selection of books on analytical and Jungian psychology – you’re sure to find some that capture your imagination and spark your intellectual curiosity.

Analytical Psychology
admin

The Collective Unconscious: Journey into the Depths of Shared Psyche

Carl Gustav Jung, the Swiss psychiatrist and founder of analytical psychology, pioneered the concept of the “collective unconscious,” a term that has since echoed through the corridors of psychology, philosophy, and popular culture. This revolutionary concept transcends the boundaries of individual psychology, connecting us to a realm of shared human experiences and archetypes. This article explores the intricate realm of the collective unconscious and its significance in Jungian psychology.

Read Article
Analytical Psychology
admin

Unveiling the Symbolic Language of the Unconscious: An Exploration of Jungian Dream Symbols

Symbols play a crucial role in dream interpretation within Jungian analytical psychology. Jung believed that symbols in dreams are the language of the unconscious mind. He wrote, “Dreams are the direct expressions of unconscious psychic activity” and that “it is in dreams that we first encounter the symbol without knowing it as such” (“Man and His Symbols,” 1964).

Read Article
Train of Emotions | AI Artwork | Envision your Evolution
Analytical Psychology
admin

Unlocking the Unconscious: An Exploration of Jungian Dream Interpretation

Jung proposed that dreams serve as a tool for psychological integration, bringing to light aspects of the unconscious mind. He wrote, “The dream is a little hidden door in the innermost and most secret recesses of the soul” (“The Meaning of Psychology for Modern Man,” CW 10, para. 304). Rather than viewing dreams as merely disguised wish fulfillments, as Sigmund Freud did, Jung saw them as a bridge to our unconscious, echoing our deepest thoughts, desires, and fears.

Read Article
Painting depicting a young man. Featured image of Puer Aeternus: Archetype Anatomy
Analytical Psychology
admin

Puer Aeternus: Its Impact on Personal Growth and Relationships

Puer aeternus. Latin for “eternal child,” used in mythology to designate a child-god who is forever young; psychologically it refers to an older man whose emotional life has remained at an adolescent level, usually coupled with too great a dependence on the mother.

The shadow of the puer is the senex (Latin for old man), associated with the god Cronus—disciplined, controlled, responsible, rational, ordered. Conversely, the shadow of the senex is the puer, related to Hermes or Dionysus—unbounded instinct, disorder, intoxication, whimsy. Like all archetypes, the puer is bipolar, exhibiting both a “positive” and a “negative” aspect.

Read Article
Featured Image for Quick Guide: The Active Imagination Technique; Salvador Dali Surrealist painting depicting a dream
Analytical Psychology
admin

The Active Imagination Technique: A Quick Guide for Beginners

Active imagination is a meditation technique in analytical psychology used to bridge the gap between the conscious and unconscious minds: opening oneself to the unconscious and giving free rein to fantasy, while at the same time maintaining an active, attentive, conscious point of view. This strategy leads to a synthesis that contains both perspectives, but in a new and surprising way. Active imagination is considered an important aiding technique in the process of individuation and you can learn how to practice it alone by exploring the most obvious expressions of your unconscious mind – your dreams.

Read Article
Featured Image for Bring to light your true self by adopting Jung's individuation process - Salvador Dali - Gala Contemplating the Mediterranean Sea
Analytical Psychology
admin

The Power of Individuation: Uncovering Your Authentic Self

In Jungian psychology, also called analytical psychology, individuation is the process where the individual self develops out of an undifferentiated unconscious – seen as a developmental psychic process during which innate elements of personality, the components of the immature psyche, and the experiences of the person’s life become, if the process is more or less successful, integrated over time into a well-functioning whole. Other psychoanalytic theorists describe it as the stage where an individual transcends group attachment and narcissistic self-absorption.

Read Article

Analytical psychology book recommendations

Amazon Bookshelf

Mask picture used as featured Image for Persona: Archetype Anatomy
Analytical Psychology
admin

Understanding The Persona: Archetype Anatomy

The persona, for Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, was the social face the individual presented to the world—”a kind of mask, designed on the one hand to make a definite impression upon others, and on the other to conceal the true nature of the individual”.

Jung’s individuation process starts from this level, of the persona, of the social mask, trying to break the artificial convention through awareness of its presence and function, and the attenuation of its often oppressive-imperative character.

Read Article
Featured Image for The Wise old man: Archetype Anatomy - Monochrome Photography of an old man
Analytical Psychology
admin

The Wise Old Man: Exploring the Psychology of the Archetype

The wise old man (also called senex, sage or sophos) is an archetype as described by Carl Jung, as well as a classic literary figure, and may be seen as a stock character. The wise old man can be a profound philosopher distinguished for wisdom and sound judgment.

In literature, the sage often takes the form of a mentor or a teacher to the hero, playing a crucial role in the hero’s journey. The sage archetype may be portrayed by a God or a Godess, a magician or wizard, a philosopher or an advisor.

Read Article
Featured Image for Essential Steps of the Active Imagination Technique using a Salvador Dali Painting depicting a Dream that helps the visualisation of the technique
Analytical Psychology
admin

The Active Imagination Technique: Essential Steps for Creative Exploration

Active imagination is intended to bring about a state of hypnagogia. This is the state in between sleep and wakefulness, where people may be partially aware that they are dreaming.
Always remember that the principle is always the same: to allow the unconscious to manifest into consciousness and then trying to integrate its lessons, thus making important progress towards achieving what Jung called individuation.

Read Article
Anima & Animus Archetypes | Salvador Dali | Carl Jung
Analytical Psychology
admin

Understanding Anima & Animus: The Archetype Anatomy

Anima and animus are gender specific archetypal structures in the collective unconscious that are compensatory to conscious gender identity.

One of the most complex and least understood features of his theory, the idea of a contrasexual archetype, developed out of Jung’s desire to conceptualize the important complementary poles in human psychological functioning. From his experiences of the emotional power of projection in his patients and in himself, he conceived first of the anima as a numinous figure in a man’s unconscious.

Read Article
Ancient Mandala used as Featured Image for Mandala Symbolism in Analytical Psychology
Analytical Psychology
admin

Exploring the Depth of Mandala Symbolism in Analytical Psychology

Mandala is a graphical representation of the center (the Self at Jung). It can appear in dreams and visions or it can be spontaneously created as a work of art. It is present in the cultural and religious representations.
Examples of mandala can be found in all the ancient cultures. We find it in Christianity under the form of frescos with animal images representing apostles and under the form of the zodiac. The astrologic zodiac and its versions are an excellent example of mandala. Also, in the Indian spiritual practices we find fascinating representative cases of mandala, with symbols of the local pantheon.

Read Article
Jungian Mandala used as featured Image for Create your own Mandala
Analytical Psychology
admin

How to Create Your Own Mandala: A Step-by-Step Guide

In the analytical psychotherapy, which includes the recognition and the conscious integration of the contents of the collective unconscious, the spontaneous drawing of mandala is required. While a finished mandala bears importance as a focus for meditative practice, the creation process remains equally important. You can analyze your finished mandala using a map that shows the areas corresponding to important symbols of the psyche and Jungian Archetypes, such as the Persona, Animus & Anima and the Shadow.

Read Article
Envision your Evolution

Contemporary psychology

Envision your Evolution 2023 © All Rights Reserved
Scroll to Top